Geophysical Observatory Reports

Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science

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The Széchenyi István Geophysical Observatory (IAGA code: NCK, http://nckobs.hu/) near Nagycenk, Hungary was founded in 1957 during the International Geophysical Year. The observatory aims to host a unique variety of geophysical measurements in Hungary, providing continuous information about the Earth and its environment. These measurements include (but are not limited to) geomagnetic, atmospheric electrical, meteorological and upper atmospheric measurements.

The Geophysical Observatory Reports (GOR) series has been providing information to the professional and interested public since 1957, publishing both measured data from the observatory as well as scientific papers based on the measurements. In view of the extensive international contacts, the journal is published initially in German (Observatoriumsberichte) and from 1967 in English (Geophysical Observatory Reports). In 2022, the first Hungarian volume was published with the support of the Petőfi Literary Museum.

The Széchenyi István Geophysical Observatory was founded during the International Geophysical Year (in 1957-58) as a dedicated research infrastructure of the electromagnetic (EM) phenomena of the solid Earth, upper atmosphere and near-Earth space. The observatory is situated on the southern shore of lake Fertő on thick conductive sediment within the Fertő-Hanság National Park. The favorable situation shelters the observatory from most of the anthropogenic EM noises.

Nowadays the spreading common use of space technologies and the increasing exposure of the surface critical infrastructures requires the continuous observation of the state and processes of the Earth’s plasma environment which became known as space weather. These, sometimes extreme changes are associated with solar activity. In addition, comprehensive observational data from several solar cycles provide an opportunity to study long-term changes in the energy coupling between the Sun and the planet. The infrastructure consists of telluric, geomagnetic, atmospheric electricity and broadband EM field measurement systems, lightning detection, ionospheric sounding and additional background measurements like meteorological observation and ground-based support of satellite Earth observation.

The uniquely long geomagnetic and telluric recordings allow us to model and reconstruct the geodinamo and the external source current systems in the ionized upper atmosphere. Furthermore, the contemporary magnetic and electric measurements serve as remote reference for the magnetotelluric deep sounding geophysical exploration method. Records related to atmospheric electricity and lightning activity enable the investigation of the variations of regional and global thunderstorm activity which are indicators of climate change. Signals from individual lightning strokes can be used to diagnose the momentary state of the plasmasphere.

The observatory is a member of INTERMAGNET, a global network of the geomagnetic observatories. High time resolution (1 Hz) geomagnetic data are uploaded quasi-real time and also displayed real time on the website of the observatory. The DPS-4D digisonde automatically transfers data to the Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory (GIRO) system collecting ionosonde measurements from around the globe. These data are used to study the electron density changes and the plasma motion of the ionosphere in regional and global scales.

A station of the LINET lightning detection network is working in the observatory and contributes to the mapping of lightning strokes in Europe real-time. Data collected by the atmospheric electricity measurement systems are displayed quasi-real time on the website of the observatory. The observatory is part of the Automatic Whistler Detection and Analyzer Network (AWDANet) providing a cheap and effective way to routinely infer the cold plasma distribution of the inner magnetosphere.

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Attila Buzás

Geophysicist, young researcher at the Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science, member of the atmospheric physics research group. His research focuses on the DC component of the global atmospheric electric circuit.

Karolina Szabóné André

Meteorologist, young researcher at the Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science, member of the atmospheric physics research group. Her research focuses on the study of persistent cold air pool conditions and Schumann resonance transients.

Tamás Bozóki

Geophysicist, young researcher at the Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science, member of the atmospheric physics research group. His research focuses on Schumann resonances, global thunderstorm activity and the lower ionosphere.

The geodetic and geophysical basic research at the Institute extends to the observation, modeling and interpretation of the physical status and processes of the Earth’s system; the development of related theoretical (mathematical and physics-related) and experimental methods and test instruments. The responsibilities covered by the Institute’s basic activity include the continuous observation of the solid Earth and the space around the Earth (geodynamics, geomagnetism and aeronomy); the operation of the national seismological network and service; the provision of data associated with international cooperation; and the operation of periodic surveillance systems. In connection with fundamental research programs, the Institute participates in the exploration of natural resources, the scientific analysis of natural hazards and the protection of critical infrastructures in Hungary and Europe. Recently initiated new research fields include research of the deep layers of the solid Earth; research of the impact of the Sun-Earth interaction on global changes; research in the field of space geodesy with focus on developing radar interferometry technologies and their application for geodynamic purposes, which revolutionize the observation of surface movements. More about the institute.

e-mail:

Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science
9400 Sopron, Csatkai E. u. 6-8.

Supported by – https://pim.hu

Geophysical Observatory Reports

Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science

The Széchenyi István Geophysical Observatory (IAGA code: NCK, http://nckobs.hu/) near Nagycenk, Hungary was founded in 1957 during the International Geophysical Year. The observatory aims to host a unique variety of geophysical measurements in Hungary, providing continuous information about the Earth and its environment. These measurements include (but are not limited to) geomagnetic, atmospheric electrical, meteorological and upper atmospheric measurements.

The Geophysical Observatory Reports (GOR) series has been providing information to the professional and interested public since 1957, publishing both measured data from the observatory as well as scientific papers based on the measurements. In view of the extensive international contacts, the journal is published initially in German (Observatoriumsberichte) and from 1967 in English (Geophysical Observatory Reports). In 2022, the first Hungarian volume was published with the support of the Petőfi Literary Museum.

The Széchenyi István Geophysical Observatory was founded during the International Geophysical Year (in 1957-58) as a dedicated research infrastructure of the electromagnetic (EM) phenomena of the solid Earth, upper atmosphere and near-Earth space. The observatory is situated on the southern shore of lake Fertő on thick conductive sediment within the Fertő-Hanság National Park. The favorable situation shelters the observatory from most of the anthropogenic EM noises.

Nowadays the spreading common use of space technologies and the increasing exposure of the surface critical infrastructures requires the continuous observation of the state and processes of the Earth’s plasma environment which became known as space weather. These, sometimes extreme changes are associated with solar activity. In addition, comprehensive observational data from several solar cycles provide an opportunity to study long-term changes in the energy coupling between the Sun and the planet. The infrastructure consists of telluric, geomagnetic, atmospheric electricity and broadband EM field measurement systems, lightning detection, ionospheric sounding and additional background measurements like meteorological observation and ground-based support of satellite Earth observation.

The uniquely long geomagnetic and telluric recordings allow us to model and reconstruct the geodinamo and the external source current systems in the ionized upper atmosphere. Furthermore, the contemporary magnetic and electric measurements serve as remote reference for the magnetotelluric deep sounding geophysical exploration method. Records related to atmospheric electricity and lightning activity enable the investigation of the variations of regional and global thunderstorm activity which are indicators of climate change. Signals from individual lightning strokes can be used to diagnose the momentary state of the plasmasphere.

The observatory is a member of INTERMAGNET, a global network of the geomagnetic observatories. High time resolution (1 Hz) geomagnetic data are uploaded quasi-real time and also displayed real time on the website of the observatory. The DPS-4D digisonde automatically transfers data to the Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory (GIRO) system collecting ionosonde measurements from around the globe. These data are used to study the electron density changes and the plasma motion of the ionosphere in regional and global scales.

A station of the LINET lightning detection network is working in the observatory and contributes to the mapping of lightning strokes in Europe real-time. Data collected by the atmospheric electricity measurement systems are displayed quasi-real time on the website of the observatory. The observatory is part of the Automatic Whistler Detection and Analyzer Network (AWDANet) providing a cheap and effective way to routinely infer the cold plasma distribution of the inner magnetosphere.

Attila Buzás

Geophysicist, young researcher at the Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science, member of the atmospheric physics research group. His research focuses on the DC component of the global atmospheric electric circuit.

Karolina Szabóné André

Meteorologist, young researcher at the Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science, member of the atmospheric physics research group. Her research focuses on the study of persistent cold air pool conditions and Schumann resonance transients.

Tamás Bozóki

Geophysicist, young researcher at the Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science, member of the atmospheric physics research group. His research focuses on Schumann resonances, global thunderstorm activity and the lower ionosphere.

The geodetic and geophysical basic research at the Institute extends to the observation, modeling and interpretation of the physical status and processes of the Earth’s system; the development of related theoretical (mathematical and physics-related) and experimental methods and test instruments. The responsibilities covered by the Institute’s basic activity include the continuous observation of the solid Earth and the space around the Earth (geodynamics, geomagnetism and aeronomy); the operation of the national seismological network and service; the provision of data associated with international cooperation; and the operation of periodic surveillance systems. In connection with fundamental research programs, the Institute participates in the exploration of natural resources, the scientific analysis of natural hazards and the protection of critical infrastructures in Hungary and Europe. Recently initiated new research fields include research of the deep layers of the solid Earth; research of the impact of the Sun-Earth interaction on global changes; research in the field of space geodesy with focus on developing radar interferometry technologies and their application for geodynamic purposes, which revolutionize the observation of surface movements. More about the institute.

e-mail:

Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science
9400 Sopron, Csatkai E. u. 6-8.

Supported by – https://pim.hu